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Saturday, March 23

  1. page Week 7 - New Media Policy, Law & Regulation edited ... Well at this point no, but some suggest that since in the “real world” people that generate in…
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    Well at this point no, but some suggest that since in the “real world” people that generate income and have property rights, and who are involved sale or exchange are taxed[1][4]. Than those who are online in virtual world, and have the same type of interaction should also have to pay taxes [1][4]. This argument stems from equality, why should people who earn their money online not pay taxes.
    Ok, so this is where it will get complicated. If they start to get taxed for income they generate online, then will people also get taxed for virtual assets. Can you even but a real world figure on a virtual asset, since the value will dependent on whom looking at it. For example
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    but an accountaccountant may view
    Then some people suggest that the income should be taxed within the game [1], but then issues become who gets the money. If someone is playing from Australia, in American based game do they have to pay taxes to America, or will they pass it on to the Australian government? For example in second life some products get charged a value added tax even if not from European countries [5]
    Some just view that taxes are just getting out of hand, if we start taxing online games that offer real world currency, what’s next? Enforcing tax on games / exchanges that take place entirely within virtual worlds?
    (view changes)

Thursday, October 6

  1. page Week 7 - New Media Policy, Law & Regulation edited ... For an additional perspective on this topic, click here [12]. Comment 4: By Sarah Marris (…
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    For an additional perspective on this topic, click here [12].
    Comment 4:
    By Sarah Marris (N5122384)
    I don’t know what I find more absurd, people paying money for virtual game items and property, or facing the possibility of paying taxes on those items. Surely this kind of ludicrous behavior would only happen in America? A audio transcript from National Public Radio (NPR), details how one man contacted the IRS in America to see just how legal or illegal it was for him to gain income or profit on virtual property. Not only was he told that it was indeed taxable for profiting on the virtual property, but also that there are specific rules relating to bartering and the taxes that can be imposed for such. The full transcript is found at the link below:
    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5199966

    References
    one[1] Terando, W. D. 2007. It's Just a Game, Or Is It? Real Money, Real Income, and Real Taxes in Virtual Worlds. Accessed September 12, 2011. http://blackboard.qut.edu.au/webapps/blackboard/content/contentWrapper.jsp?content_id=_3851279_1&displayName=Week+7&course_id=_75786_1&navItem=content&href=http%3A%2F%2Fdigitalcommons.butler.edu%2Fcgi%2Fviewcontent.cgi%3Farticle%3D1053%26amp%3Bcontext%3Dcob_papers%26amp%3Bsei-redir%3D1%23search%3D%2522Its%2520just%2520game%252C%2520or%2520it%253F%2520Real%2520money%252C%2520real%2520income%252C%2520real%2520taxes%2522.
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    9:13 pm
  2. page Week 9 - Technologies & Societies edited ... Media convergence is an ongoing process; it will never reach an end [10]. While at this stage …
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    Media convergence is an ongoing process; it will never reach an end [10]. While at this stage we can draw a somewhat clear line between old and new media, the definitions we have for each will not always stay the same. Think about it, at some point newspaper, radio, and old media where new, they in fact would have replaced several other mediums. It is just a cycle, in the future what we have now classified as new media will have been replaced by a newer media, and the cycle continues. There will never be one black box controlling all media, we are entering an era where media will be everywhere, and we will use all kinds of media in relation to one another [10].
    Comment 4:
    By Sarah Marris (N5122384)
    Kate reflects on the notion that new media technologies themselves are not of a great importance, but rather the people using the new media technologies. I think this is an interesting point as it infers that although there is much digital evolution, and as a society of consumers and also new media producers, we are in fact, as a people, at the centre of it all. The technology is evolving but its success is, at the core, driven by us. The following article offers an interesting point on what will happen to the social networking site, Facebook, when the people run out?
    http://socialtimes.com/once-facebook-runs-out-of-people-it-will-need-new-products_b66409

    References List
    1[1] Jenkins, H. 2006. Convergence Culture: Where Old and New Media Collide. New York: New York University Press.
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    8:44 pm
  3. page Week 9 - Technologies & Societies edited ... [9] http://www.ojr.org/ojr/people/davidwestphal/200910/1784/ Comment 3: By Wanda Rebolledo …
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    [9] http://www.ojr.org/ojr/people/davidwestphal/200910/1784/
    Comment 3:
    By Wanda Rebolledo (N7181175)
    Media convergence is an ongoing process; it will never reach an end [10]. While at this stage we can draw a somewhat clear line between old and new media, the definitions we have for each will not always stay the same. Think about it, at some point newspaper, radio, and old media where new, they in fact would have replaced several other mediums. It is just a cycle, in the future what we have now classified as new media will have been replaced by a newer media, and the cycle continues. There will never be one black box controlling all media, we are entering an era where media will be everywhere, and we will use all kinds of media in relation to one another [10].

    Comment 4:
    By
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    8[8] Goldsborough, R. 2011. “New Versus Old Media.” Last modified October 5, 2011. http://www.infotoday.com/linkup/lud101505-goldsborough.shtml
    8[9] Westphal, D. 2009. The Online Journalism Review. “Old Media vs. New Media: Let’s Call This One Off.” Last modified October 7, 2009. http://www.ojr.org/ojr/people/davidwestphal/200910/1784/
    ten[10] Jenkin, H. 2001. Convergence? I Diverge. Accessed October 6, 2011.
    http://web.mit.edu/cms/People/henry3/converge.pdf

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    1:09 am
  4. page Week 8 - New Media Beyond 1st Worlds edited ... In countries where the Internet and other technologies are less/not accessible, uneducated peo…
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    In countries where the Internet and other technologies are less/not accessible, uneducated people and societies that are not benefiting from the information age cannot be competitive in the global economy [8]. Unfortunately this appears to be a social issue as well as an issue of technology.
    Comment 2:
    By Wanda Rebolled0Rebolledo(N7181175)
    The countries that are most disadvantaged now, are the same that have been disadvantaged in the past and will be in the future. These are countries in continents such as Africa, South America, and the Middle East.
    The following two images demonstrate how the world would be shaped based on the amount of internet usage[9]. As it is seen internet usage in the developing countries were slim to none at the turn of the millennium [9]. With Africa barely even registering on the map and while it did go between then and 2007, there really was not a major change in the circumstances [9].
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    12:20 am
  5. page Week 7 - New Media Policy, Law & Regulation edited ... Comments Comment 1: ... Jae Moran (n7157266) (N7157266) Tax Consequences of Virtual Wo…
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    Comments
    Comment 1:
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    Jae Moran (n7157266)(N7157266)
    Tax Consequences of Virtual World Transactions
    Wanda’s post raises a valid point regarding the tax consequences of virtual world transactions. Do assets and financial gains accumulated in a virtual world fall under the same jurisdiction as real world assets and real financial currency?
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    12[12] Cheng, J. 2006. "The taxman cometh? IRS urged to tax virtual worlds, economies". Accessed October 5, 2011.
    http://arstechnica.com/gaming/news/2009/01/taxpayer-advocate-urges-irs-to-tax-economy-in-virtual-worlds.ars

    (view changes)
    12:18 am
  6. page Week 9 - Technologies & Societies edited ... 5[5] Sales, L. 2010. “All technology has an unintended downside”. On Lateline. ABC TV (broadca…
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    5[5] Sales, L. 2010. “All technology has an unintended downside”. On Lateline. ABC TV (broadcast April 12, 2010). Television program.
    5[6] Chakaveh, S. & Bogen, M. 2007. Media Convergence: An Introduction. Doi 10.1007/978-3-540-73110-8_88
    [7]7[7] EXA News
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    2010. http://www.exa.com.au/articles/december_10/the_decline_of_print_media/
    [8]

    8[8]
    Goldsborough, R.
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    2011. http://www.infotoday.com/linkup/lud101505-goldsborough.shtml
    [9]

    8[9]
    Westphal, D.
    (view changes)
    12:12 am

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